Dungeonland

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Dungeonland
Dungeonland01.jpg
Type Adventure module
Code/ Abbreviation EX1
Edition AD&D 1st edition
Author(s) Gary Gygax
First Published 1983
Series EX1 EX2
Classification Canon
This article is about the module. For the demiplane region of the same name, see Land Beyond the Magic Mirror.

EX1 - Dungeonland (EX1) is a module for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, written by Gary Gygax for use with the First Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) ruleset.

The nature of the adventure is such that it is easy to add into almost any campaign.

Dungeonland was actually adapted from one of Gygax's own campaigns, and was accessed via Castle Greyhawk. This module was distinctive primarily because the adventure was a close adaptation of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, with the various characters from the book translated into AD&D terms.

The module is intended to be a "fun" adventure, in which events are supposed to move along in Carrollesque fashion, and the players do better to go with the flow. Nevertheless, there are plenty of deadly situations, and players must stay on their toes.

In the afterword, Gygax mentions that this was an early part of the Greyhawk world, and that his players visited it multiple times. Dr. Joyce Brothers is mentioned as having played.

The module is paired with The Land Beyond the Magic Mirror, which is based on Carroll's Through the Looking Glass. In a (perhaps intentional) mixup, the scene on the cover is actually from the other module, and vice versa.

Receiving 9 out of 10, the module was positively reviewed in Issue 48 of White Dwarf magazine. The reviewer Jim Bambra enjoyed its sense of humor and exciting role-play, but criticized that it needn't have been written for such high level characters (a common problem in early modules), and could have been modified for lower level ones.

Bibliography

  • Bambra, Jim. "Open Box: Dungeon Modules." White Dwarf #48. Nottingham, UK: Games Workshop, 1983.